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commuting safely: Our Knitting Journal

staying safe while pregnant and commuting

7 tips for commuting while being pregnant?

Travelling while pregnant can be a mixed bag depending on your route, the time you travel and how you are feeling during your pregnancy generally. Here are some tips for safe commuting while pregnant. Wear clothes that are comfortable and loose While wearing loose clothing, including trousers with an elasticated waistband, is good advice, it doesn’t offer much protection against the cold. Many larger-sized maternity

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Travelling while pregnant can be a mixed bag depending on your route, the time you travel and how you are feeling during your pregnancy generally. Here are some tips for safe commuting while pregnant.

Wear clothes that are comfortable and loose

staying safe while pregnant and commuting

While wearing loose clothing, including trousers with an elasticated waistband, is good advice, it doesn’t offer much protection against the cold. Many larger-sized maternity clothes are not suitable for colder climes either. Some people find it useful to carry a coat or blanket on the bus or train with them.

Wear a 'baby on board badge'

Wearing a ‘baby on board‘ pin badge is a good way to let other commuters know you’re expecting. It’s also helpful for those who think they might be suffering from morning sickness as it makes it clear that there isn’t a problem with vomiting on public transport.

Pack a comfortable cushion

Driving or riding in a car is another commuting option. Make sure you have a pillow behind your back for extra comfort and take frequent breaks from sitting or standing for long periods.

 

Use a pillow behind your back when driving or riding in a carExercise regularly to help with back pain and other discomforts.

Take frequent breaks from sitting or standing for long periods of time

Taking frequent breaks, drinking plenty of fluids and exercising regularly can all help to ease discomfort. If you suffer from backache or leg cramps, try to stand up every 30 minutes or so, or walk along the carriage if this is allowed. Taking regular walks during your break and after work can also help.

Eat and drink enough to nourish your baby and yourself

Young woman inside the bus

Taking care not to skip meals is important for your health. If morning sickness makes eating difficult, try drinking small portions of different foods frequently throughout the day rather than larger portions less often. It’s better to eat little and often like this than one or two large meals which you can’t keep down.

Exercise regularly to help with back pain and other discomforts

Regular exercise will help keep aches and pains at bay and make it easier to stay healthy while commuting on public transport. It’s important to remember that the baby is very well-cushioned in the womb and is unlikely to be harmed by bumps and jolts during your commute. A short walk in the fresh air before and after work will help to clear out your lungs and can clear a stuffy head if you’re feeling nauseous too.

Avoid wearing tight clothes, which can cause discomfort by restricting the abdomen

Maternity clothes aren’t flattering, but they offer better protection than regular clothes. A lot of maternity trousers are designed to be worn with elasticated waistbands, like these, which make them very comfortable without restricting your breathing or stomach muscles.

 

Many people say wearing maternity leggings is one of the most comfortable things ever! They’re also fantastic for commuting as they can be rolled up when it’s warm and pulled down when the heating is on.

 

There are many ways to make commuting more manageable and comfortable while pregnant. If you don’t want to wear maternity clothes, tight jeans or trousers can cause discomfort by restricting your stomach muscles. You could also wear a long top over your trousers to cover up and protect your growing bump.

staying safe while pregnant and commuting